PRZYSΜWIA ANGIELSKIE
Przys這wia s m康ro軼i narodu ! Jad帷 za granic warto zna przys這wia ludzi mieszkaj帷ych w kraju naszej podr騜y. Przys這wia angielskie s bardzo cz瘰to podobne do polskich, ale nie dajcie si zwie嗆... czasami przys這wia po angielsku mog znaczy zupe軟ie co innego ni po polsku. Tak瞠 aby poprawi sw鎩 j瞛yk angielski warto uczy si angielskich przys堯w.

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Never marry for money, but marry where money is.


Never mention rope in the house of a man who has been hanged.


Never put off till tomorrow what you can do today.


Never send a boy to do a man’s job.


Never speak ill of the dead.


Never tell tales out of school.


Never too old to learn.


Never trouble trouble till trouble troubles you.


New brooms sweep clean.


New lords, new laws.


Night brings counsel.


Nine tailors make a man.


No cure, no pay.


No man can serve two masters.


No man is a hero to his valet.


No money, no Swiss.


No moon, no man.


No names, no pack-drill.


No news is good news.


No one should be judge in his own cause.


No pain, no gain.


No penny, no paternoster.


No smoke without fire.


No time like the present.


None but the brave deserve the fair.


Nothing comes of nothing.


Nothing for nothing.


Nothing is certain but death and taxes.


Nothing is certain but the unforeseen.


Nothing should be done in haste but gripping a flea.


Nothing so bad but it might have been worse.


Nothing so bold as a blind mare.


Nothing succeeds like success.


Nothing venture, nothing gain.


Nothing venture, nothing have.


Obey orders, if you break owners.


Of two evils choose the less.


Offenders never pardon.


Old habits die hard.


Old sins cast long shadows.


Old soldiers never die.


On Saint Thomas the Divine kill all turkeys, geese and swine.


On the first of March, the crows begin to search.


Once a priest, always a priest.


Once a whore, always a whore.


Once bitten, twice shy.


One cannot love and be wise.


One does not wash one’s dirty linen in public.


One Englishman can beat three Frenchmen.


One for sorrow; two for mirth, three for a wedding, four for a birth.